• Telephone Fieldwork

    DigiPoll provides quality computer assisted telephone interviewing services to market researchers, government organizations, small businesses, and media outlets.
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CATI Survey Specialists

Since 1996 DigiPoll has been conducting precise quantitative research fieldwork, nationally and internationally. Specialising in telephone surveys, we make polling an art as well as a science. Our data collected by telephone surveys use exclusive RDD samples that have been recognized by market researchers, consultants, academics and pollsters as accuracy with the highest resolution.

DigiPolls have become a benchmark for public opinion and we take great pride in being precision pollsters.

We are delighted to announce that DigiPoll had achieved a three-year ISO 20252 accreditation as of the 14th of June 2013. The implementation of ISO 20252 in New Zealand was initiated and facilitated by AMRO (NZ Association of Market Research Organizations).

Latest DigiPolls

Digipoll: Minor parties surge as Labour sinks lower

Thursday, 28 August 2014 Written by

New Zealand First, the Conservatives and Internet Mana are on the move up and Labour is still slipping, in the latest Herald DigiPoll survey. That will be unwelcome news to Labour leader David Cunliffe as he prepares for his first face-off against Prime Minister John Key in the election campaign, at 7pm on One.

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Two thirds of voters believe citizens-initiated referenda should be binding - survey

Wednesday, 27 August 2014 Written by

A key policy plank for NZ First and the Conservative Party has been given a boost after two thirds of voters said they believed citizens-initiated referenda should be binding on a Government. The Herald DigiPoll survey showed 66 per cent of respondents agreed such referenda should be binding while 22 per cent said they should not.


Book fallout not all bad, poll shows

Friday, 22 August 2014 Written by

More than half of voters surveyed believe the fallout from Nicky Hager's Dirty Politics book will damage Prime Minister John Key - but only 11 per cent believe it would cause a lot of damage.

 

Today's Herald-DigiPoll survey began just after the release of that book, and 43 per cent of respondents said it would cause a little damage while a further 11 per cent believed it would cause a lot of damage. About one quarter said it would cause no damage.